A report on the allegory of the unfaithful wife in the book of ezekiel in the bible

Ezekiel Chapter 23 Ezekiel This chapter describes the spiritual infidelity of Israel and Judah, pictured as two sisters, to convey the gravity of sin in Judah.

A report on the allegory of the unfaithful wife in the book of ezekiel in the bible

Verses The Foundling Child who became an Unfaithful Wife From Hosea onwards the prophets spoke of idolatry under the figure of unchastity. God was the husband of Israel, but she proved unfaithful to Him.

This thought has already been expressed by Ezekiel in Ezekiel 6: The subject is nominally the city of Jerusalem, but really the whole nation of Israel. Jerusalem was a girl-child of heathen extraction, who was exposed in infancy to die Ezekiel God saw her and saved her life, and she grew to maturity, though still in a poor and mean condition Ezekiel Then He took her to be His wife, loading her with every honour Ezekiel But she was disloyal to Him, admitting idols as her lovers at the high places, and lavishing on them the gifts God had bestowed upon her Ezekiel She even sacrificed to them her own children whom she had borne to God Ezekiel By borrowing the idolatries of the surrounding nations, Egypt, Assyria and Babylonia, she j made them all her paramours, with every aggravation of guilt Ezekiel Her sin had already brought reproach upon her from hostile neighbours like the Philistines Ezekiel Men would speak of her as the true daughter of her parents, the true sister of Samaria and Sodom, whose guilt had been less than hers; though she had despised them in her pride Ezekiel Her humiliation would I be completed by her being put on a level with them, and sharing the mercy extended to them Ezekiel Nevertheless God would not forget His love for her, but would pity and restore her, giving her Samaria and Sodom for daughters instead of sisters.

Ezekiel 16 Commentary - Dummelow's Commentary on the Bible

Humbled, ashamed, and forgiven, she would know at last the true character of God Ezekiel It was a Canaanite city, inhabited by Jebusites, long before it became the capital of God's kingdom. Amorite] a general name for some of the tribes originally inhabiting Canaan: Hittite] The Hittites, or children of Heth, were another portion of the original inhabitants of Canaan: Another branch of the Hittites had a powerful empire to the N.

Thou hast increased, etc. The past tense should be read throughout the verse. A covenant] a marriage covenant, probably with reference to the covenant at Sinai. Badgers' skin] RV 'sealskin,' probably the skin of the dugong, an herbivorous cetacean found in the Red Sea.

A jewel on thy forehead] RV 'a ring upon thy nose': High places] the seats of ancient Canaanite worship, retained by the Israelites for the worship of the true God, but perverted to their old uses:Ezekiel uses this idiom mostly in connection with pagan idolatries (cf.

; ; ), however, is a future-oriented exception (i.e., the Messianic temple). "you did not remember the days of your youth" The verb "remember" (BDB , KB , Qal perfect) occurs twice.

A report on the allegory of the unfaithful wife in the book of ezekiel in the bible

Verses The Foundling Child who became an Unfaithful Wife. From Hosea onwards the prophets spoke of idolatry under the figure of unchastity. God was the husband of Israel, but she proved unfaithful to Him. Jul 26,  · Ezekiel Allegory of Prophecy (This imagery is very common in biblical literature, and Ezekiel uses the unfaithful wife motif extensively.) Jerusalem even sacrifices her children - the most tangible sign of the covenant with her husband God - to the false gods.

I seek to read the bible as a piece of literature, written. AN ALLEGORY OF UNFAITHFUL JERUSALEM Text: Ezekiel , 1. The word of the Lord came to me: 2. “Son of man, confront Jerusalem with her detestable “‘You adulterous wife!

You prefer strangers to your own husband! Every prostitute receives a fee, but you give gifts to all your and sentences as well as of ideas in Ezekiel Ezekiel " The word of the LORD came again unto me, saying, " " Son of man, there were two women, the daughters of one mother: ".

This is the beginning of a new prophecy. This chapter describes the spiritual infidelity of Israel and Judah, pictured as two sisters, to convey the gravity of sin in Judah.

Ezekiel seized upon the metaphor of the marriage covenant, so dramatically depicted in Hosea , expanded and elaborated it, and made it the startling "Allegory of the Unfaithful Wife," fully meriting the brutal and sadistic punishment of .

Ezekiel Chapter 23 Explained