An analysis of education religion and culture of romanians

Doing business in Romania: A past of invasions and occupations, Romania has recently undergone dynamic social and economic changes and joined the EU in

An analysis of education religion and culture of romanians

Romanians adopted Eastern Orthodoxy in the late ninth to early tenth centuries. Rural religion was eclectic: Quasipolitical religious cults like Hosts of the Lord Oastea Domnului developed between the world wars, and currently a variety of Protestant sects are attracting increased numbers of adherents.

Traditional beliefs recognized the Trinity and a number of other spirits and forces, both benevolent and malign. The latter include vircolaci, strigoi, and moroi witches, undead human and animal spirits that brought illness and death to their former communities. Beneficial forces included white magic practiced by sorceresses and the curative powers of Whitsuntide dancers.

Religious practice and education is now legally limited and controlled by the state Ministry of Cults. Orthodox and Uniate priests served pre-Socialist era communities as advisers, social arbiters, and leading economic figures.

The churches owned extensive lands and priests received labor and other needs gratis from citizens. Even today priests receive the best of the annual vintage and other gifts. However, as state employees, Orthodox priests now find their community activism restricted by the government.

Religion and expressive culture - Romanians

Traditional arts focused on the production of utilitarian household objects or religious items. Woven and embroidered clothing, rugs, and wall hangings were especially well developed, as was the carving of decorative wood gates, grave markers, and utensils.

Transylvania's icons, painted on glass, and the painted monasteries of Moldavia are world-reknowned. The interwar period also saw a flowering of Romanian art, best exemplified by the work of the sculptor Constantin Brancusi.

Culture Name

Currently, plastic arts are widely emphasized. Traditional folk medicine made extensive use of locally grown plants prepared as teas or poultices. Some plants such as garlic and wormwood were thought to be especially efficacious.

As illness was often attributed to spirit possession, various kinds of healing rituals were also used.

Religion in Romania - Wikipedia

Although less respected in the past, physicians today are afforded high social status in Romanian communities. Although Christian belief in heaven and hell is common, a practical streak frequently denies the reality of the afterlife.

In either case, death is not feared and is fairly well integrated into daily life. The dead are generally thought to need similar things as the living e.Oct 29,  · For example, just 11% in Germany and 10% in the United Kingdom say that religion is very important in their lives, compared with 55% of adults in Greece and 50% in Romania.

That said, Europeans across the continent are, by a number of measures, generally less religious than adults in other regions surveyed by Pew Research Center, such as sub.

An analysis of education religion and culture of romanians

Seventy percent of the population is Romanian Orthodox, 6 percent is Roman Catholic (of which 3 percent is Uniate), 6 percent is Protestant, and 18 percent professes no religious affiliation.

Under communism, religion was suppressed; churches were destroyed, and clergy were arrested. The interactions between Romanians and the tribes that invaded the region helped in developing and shaping the Romanian culture.

An analysis of education religion and culture of romanians

Despite the influence of such interactions, the main elements of Romanian culture such as . Romanians typically identify as Romanian, and much like their nation's history, the individuals have never really seemed to define this term other than in ethnic terms.

In this way, the definition of this identity is rather vague, but is reliant on the ethnicity of the individual and to a lesser degree also the language, religion, and culture.

Rural religion was eclectic: nature worship, pilgrimages to sites of miracles, and belief in a pantheon of both good and evil spirits mixed with Christian belief.

Quasipolitical religious cults like Hosts of the Lord (Oastea Domnului) developed between the world wars, and currently a variety of Protestant sects are attracting increased numbers of adherents. Religion – The majority of Romanians are members of the Romanian Orthodox Church, in fact they make up the second largest population of Orthodox Christians anywhere in the world after Russia.

An analysis of education religion and culture of romanians