Essays in the history of canadian law flaherty

OntarioPrivate law incl. Published with the University of Toronto Press, This volume, containing nine essays, is the second of two designed to illustrate the wide possibilities for research and writing in Canadian legal history. In combination, these two volumes of essays reflect the wide-ranging scope of legal history as an intellectual discipline and will encourage others to pursue important avenues of inquiry on all aspects of our legal past.

Essays in the history of canadian law flaherty

Subscribe Google Whatsapp Pinterest Digg Linkedin Stumbleupon Vk Print Delicious Buffer Pocket Xing Tumblr Mail Yummly Telegram Flipboard Advertisement A rudimentary difference between fiction narratives and documentary film is supposed to be that one is created out of the imagination, and the other is a recorded document of real events.

Essays in the history of canadian law flaherty

Yet if we go right back to the very first feature length documentary, Robert J. A popular success when it was released inNanook brought its heroic title character to an audience who knew nothing about the Native tribes of the north.

The film shows a way of life that was disappearing as Flahertyoriginally an explorer and prospector, began to document it. We see the hardy Inuit Nanook hunting with spears, pulling up to a trading station in a kayak and trading with the white owner.

We see his wife and kids, the family building an igloo and bedding down for the night. And it fully cemented the idea of the Eskimo in popular culture. Nanook became a name as synonymous with the Inuit as Pierre is to the French.

Frank Zappa even wrote a song suite about Nanook. Flaherty was not trained in film, and learned what he could quickly about photography when he decided to shoot footage up north while working for the Canadian Pacific Railway.

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He accidentally destroyed all of his original footage when he dropped a cigarette on the flammable nitrite film and set about raising money for a reshoot. Without precedent, Flaherty rethought his doc into what we now recognize as classic form: Instead of trying to capture the culture, he chose one man as his main character, an entry into an unknown world.

And in those reshoots we find the line between fiction and fact blurred. Flaherty wanted to represent Inuit life before the European influence, and Allakariallak played along, not just hunting with his spear, but pretending at the trade outpost not to recognize a gramophone. The scenes inside the igloo were staged for good reason: So Allakariallak and the crew built a cutaway igloo where the family could pretend to bed down for the night.

Flaherty's legacy was in combining ethnography, travelogue, and showing how people live and work, none of which had been done before in film. Flaherty continued to make documentaries intoincluding Man of Aran about life on the Irish isle of the same name and Tabu, a Polynesian island tale directed by F.

Murnaubest known for Nosferatu. But none had the impact of this film. When the Library of Congress first started listing films in for preservation, specifying ones that were "culturally, historically, or aesthetically significant," Nanook was in the first selection of The idea of building a living habitat in order to control the action still happens in nature documentaries, and humans readily playing a version of themselves to tell a certain kind of narrative is the basis of all reality TV.

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Is it better that we believe that Nanook died out on the ice, a victim of the harsh reality of survival on the ice, or to know that he actually died at home from tuberculosis?

Great Classics, Indies, Noir, Westerns, etc.Essays in the History of Canadian Law: Professor Flaherty supplies an introduction to the writing of Canadian legal history and, with his contributors, provides an important building block on which a significant tradition of indigenous legal history in Canada may grow and flourish.

The Osgoode Society for Canadian Legal History was established in to promote the publication of work on the history of Canadian law, and to create and preserve an oral history archive.

Header image courtesy of Tim Fraser for The Law Society of . Reviews of Essays in the History of Canadian Law, Volume II From almost every standpoint it is an exceptional accomplishment. The mature scholarship in this volume testifies again to the careful and insistent hand of editor Flaherty.

WANL. Writers’ Alliance of Newfoundland & Labrador. Founded in , the Writers’ Alliance of Newfoundland and Labrador (WANL) contributes to a supportive environment for writing in the province; works to nurture and inspire writers at all levels and stages of their careers; fosters public recognition of NL writers; advocates for the well-being of writers; and promotes the enhancement of.

A rudimentary difference between fiction narratives and documentary film is supposed to be that one is created out of the imagination, and the other is a recorded document of real events. Yet if we go right back to the very first feature length documentary, Robert J. Flaherty’s Nanook of the North.

The purpose of The Osgoode Society is to encourage research and writing in the history of Canadian law. The Society, which was incorporated in and is registered as a charity, was founded at the initiative of the Honourable R. Roy McMurtry, Attorney General of Ontario, and officials of The Law.

OWTL | Workers' Compensation Law - A Documentary History in Ontario