Play analysis antigone

Polynices and his brother Eteocles, however, are both dead, killed by each other, according to the curse of Oedipus, their father.

Play analysis antigone

Creonthe new ruler of Thebes and brother of the former Queen Jocasta, has decided that Eteocles will be honored and Polyneices will be in public shame. Antigone and Ismene are the sisters of the dead Polyneices and Eteocles.

Be Book-Smarter.

In the opening of the play, Antigone brings Ismene outside the palace gates late at night for a secret meeting: Ismene refuses to help her, not believing that it will actually be possible to bury their brother, who is under guard, but she is unable to stop Antigone from going to bury her brother herself.

The leader of the chorus pledges his support out of deference to Creon. A sentry enters, fearfully reporting that the body has been given funeral rites and a symbolic burial with a thin covering of earth, though no one who actually committed the crime saw this.

Creon, furious, orders the sentry to find the culprit or face death himself. The sentry leaves, and the chorus sings about honouring the gods, but after a short Play analysis antigone, he returns, bringing Antigone with him.

Creon questions her after sending the sentry away, and she does not deny what she has done. She argues unflinchingly with Creon about the immorality of the edict and the morality of her actions.

Ismene tries to confess falsely to the crime, wishing to die alongside her sister, but Antigone will not have it.

Creon orders that the two women be temporarily imprisoned. He initially seems willing to forsake Antigone, but when Haemon gently tries to persuade his father to spare Antigone, claiming that "under cover of darkness the city mourns for the girl", the discussion deteriorates, and the two men are soon bitterly insulting each other.

When Creon threatens to execute Antigone in front of his son, Haemon leaves, vowing never to see Creon again. Creon decides to spare Ismene and to bury Antigone alive in a cave.

Play analysis antigone

By not killing her directly, he hopes to pay the minimal respects to the gods. She is brought out of the house, and this time, she is sorrowful instead of defiant. She expresses her regrets at not having married and dying for following the laws of the gods. She is taken away to her living tomb, with the Leader of the Chorus expressing great sorrow for what is going to happen to her.

Tiresiasthe blind prophet, enters. Tiresias warns Creon that Polyneices should now be urgently buried because the gods are displeased, refusing to accept any sacrifices or prayers from Thebes. Creon accuses Tiresias of being corrupt.

All of Greece will despise Creon, and the sacrificial offerings of Thebes will not be accepted by the gods. Creon assents, leaving with a retinue of men. The chorus delivers a choral ode to the god Dionysus god of wine and of the theater; this part is the offering to their patron god.

A messenger enters to tell the leader of the chorus that Antigone has killed herself. The messenger reports that Creon saw to the burial of Polyneices.

Related Questions

After unsuccessfully attempting to stab Creon, Haemon stabbed himself. He understands that his own actions have caused these events and blames himself.The Chorus introduces the players. Antigone is the girl who will rise up alone and die young. Haemon, Antigone's dashing fiancé, chats with Ismene, her beautiful sister.

Though one would have expected Haemon to go for Ismene, he inexplicably proposed to Antigone on the night of a ball. Creon is. Antony And Cleopatra: Theme Analysis, Free Study Guides and book notes including comprehensive chapter analysis, complete summary analysis, author biography information, character profiles, theme analysis, metaphor analysis, and top ten quotes on classic literature.

Among the many notable elements of Antigone that might be discussed in analyzing the play, we might look at (1) the essential and highly important thematic differences between the characters of.

After the bloody siege of Thebes by Polynices and his allies, the city stands unconquered. Polynices and his brother Eteocles, however, are both dead, killed by .

Oedipus Rex - Wikipedia

Play Summary Antigone Bookmark this page Manage My Reading List Polynices and his brother Eteocles, however, are both dead, killed by each other, according to the curse of Oedipus, their father. In this lesson, we discuss Robert Louis Stevenson's short novel, ''Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde.'' After we discuss the plot, we examine the principal characters, and analyze the.

Hippolytus (play) - Wikipedia